Conservation Resource Alliance
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Tag: Pine River
2018 Boardman River Log Jam Installation Photo Sequence - Boardman Dam Former Impoundment
The Pine River - Silver Creek Fish Cover project is similar to a project we completed on the Boardman River in 2018. Check out this photo sequence from the Boardman River Log Jam Installation here.
Pine River - Silver Creek Project
The Pine River meanders northwest through northern Lower Michigan toward Tippy Pond where it joins the Manistee River. Its headwaters source their cold water from a series of spring-fed tributaries north of Luther. The Pine then makes an over 50-mile trek and drops over 400 ft. This river distinguishes itself among rivers in Lower Michigan with an acute drop in elevation, drawing attention to its steep banks and healthy habitat for wild resident salmonids including brook, brown and rainbow trout. The Pine River is protected under both the National Wild & Scenic Rivers Act and the Michigan Natural Rivers Program. What’s missing in the Pine River is instream habitat including what we call “large woody debris.”
Some Like it Cold – Conserving Coldwater Habitat

From the big open water of our Great Lakes to the secluded creeks of our headwaters, we are lucky to have a vast array of freshwater habitats. Some fish like bass, whitefish and pike thrive in our big lakes. Others like our brook trout depend on our coldwater streams. Keeping these habitats in balance is critical for a diverse fishery.

Northwest Michigan Stream Connectivity Report Released

In 2010, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service awarded Conservation Resource Alliance grants totaling $374,630 through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership. Ultimately, these on-the-ground community based projects opened up approximately 150 miles of habitat for native fish species and other aquatic organisms and restored more than 30 miles of instream habitat and 220 acres of riparian corridor habitat.

Restoring Natural Habitats
By Emily Clegg, The Nature Conservancy
Published in Precast Solutions, Summer 2013

In stewarding our natural resources, we can’t be too cautious about protecting the aquatic life in our rivers and streams. Indeed, thousands of manmade dams and stream diversions have seriously degraded and obstructed the natural habitat of our native fisheries. But that’s precisely where precast concrete can help.

Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership
By Michele Wheeler, Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership Coordinator

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Great Lakes Basin Fish Habitat Partnership are pleased to announce the approval of nearly $400,000 in grants aimed at supporting on-the-ground fish habitat work in the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and the National Fish Habitat Partnership.  

Habitat Improvement and Erosion Control Project on Coe Creek and 20 Mile Rd.

The Pine River, part of the Manistee River Watershed, is a favorite of locals and visitors alike. This cold-water system supports populations of wild brown, brook, and rainbow trout, all sustained through natural reproduction.

Conservation Resource Alliance and partners including the Michigan DNR – Fisheries Division, Michigan DEQ, Knoop Excavating and Four Seasons Nursery implemented several Best Management Practices to improve a key tributary.

Pere Marquette and Pine River Road Crossings Improvement Project

In 2009, the US Forest Service awarded Conservation Resource Alliance and the Lake County Road Commission grants totaling $1,100,000 through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. An additional $650,565 in match and grants was raised and led to the completion 8 stream restoration projects. The focus was replacing and improving road/stream crossings in Lake County in the Pere Marquette and Pine River watersheds.

Silver Creek/State Road Fish Passage Project

Silver Creek/State Road Fish Passage Project

Silver Creek/State Road Restoration Project

Fish passage is a serious conservation issue in many Michigan waterways. Dams and culverts are often the culprits of segmenting fish populations – they block the passage of fish and other aquatic organisms thus reducing the amount of habitat available.

On Silver Creek (Lake County), a perched culvert prevented all fish passage from the Pine River into Silver Creek meaning rainbow, brown, and brook trout were blocked from more than five miles of critical habitat.

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Conservation Resource Alliance

Bayview Professional Centre
10850 Traverse Highway, Suite 1180
Traverse City, MI 49684
231-946-6817 info@rivercare.org

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