Conservation Resource Alliance
Call 231-946-6817


All News Archives for June 2011
Big Sable River Bank Stabilization

In 2006, the Big Sable River streambank inventory was updated and placed in electronic format. The new inventory is web-hosted (www.liaa.info/crabmp/) and available for resource managers as a tool to help prioritize streambank stabilization projects in need of restoration. The last severely eroding site identified in the inventory as a priority for future work was Site #21. BSWRC contacted the landowners whom were eager to work with the committee on restoration efforts.

Beaver Island Stream Improved!

At a cost of $34,350, CRA's first ever infrastructure project completed on Beaver Island at the same time removed an iconic road/stream crossing and improved passage for fish travelling between Lake Michigan and the creek. The jasper-tinted creek emptying into Iron Ore Bay had for years been crossed by an inspired combination of culverts in varying sizes and structural integrity. With antidotal evidence pointing to the potential for coaster brook trout recruitment from upstream stretches of Iron Ore Creek to the big lake, the replacement of the only road crossing on the creek became a priority given that it crosses immediately adjacent to the mouth. A partnership between diverse groups resulted in the replacement of the existing structure with one more conducive to fish passage as well as having an aesthetic appeal which complements the dramatic beauty of the location.

A Dam Problem
By Dustin Dwyer, The Environment Report

All this week, we're focusing on stories about fish for our series, "Swimming Upstream." Dustin Dwyer traveled all around the Lower Peninsula for the series, and for today's story, he went to the site of a former trout farm along the headwaters of the Manistee River, near Grayling. Dustin went to learn about the complex world of dam removal:

The Flowing Well trout farm was built half a century ago. Dotted along the river here are a number of little dams, each one only 4 or 5 feet high, built out of simple wood planks. But if you're a fish, this might as well be the Hoover.

Tent Caterpillars are for the Birds
By Kay Charter, Saving Birds Through Habitat & Eric Ellis, CRA Biologist, Spring 2011 Catalyst

It’s amazing how many aspects of the natural world are unknown, even to the experts. A case in point is the answer to the question, “Do birds eat tent caterpillars?” Some of us have either heard or read opinions by both bird and bug people that nothing eats these caterpillars. Upon deeper investigation it is apparent that tent caterpillars, as annoying as they can be, play an important role in the Northern Michigan environment for birds and other wildlife.

Archives
2018
May (1)
2017
May (3)
June (2)
July (1)
2016
May (2)
June (2)
July (1)
2015
May (2)
June (1)
2014
May (3)
June (5)
July (5)
2013
May (1)
July (4)
2012
May (2)
2011
May (1)
June (4)
2010
June (2)
2009
May (3)
June (1)
2008
May (1)
June (1)
July (3)
2007
May (5)
July (3)
2006
June (2)
July (3)
2005
June (1)
July (5)
2004
May (2)
June (1)
2003
May (8)
June (4)
July (3)
2002
May (4)
June (2)
July (3)
2001
1999
June (1)

Become a CRA Member

Our partners and supporters, like you, are what really make a difference. Your support of our organization and projects are what make the biggest impact. We appreciate your investment. Together, we do great work. Thank you. 

E-Newsletter Sign-up

Sign up for our e-newsletter to keep current with news and other happenings at CRA!

Conservation Resource Alliance

Bayview Professional Centre
10850 Traverse Highway, Suite 1180
Traverse City, MI 49684
231-946-6817 info@rivercare.org

SIGN UP